2015: The Year in Dogfish

2015 turned out to be a pretty big year for the most under-appreciated sharks in the sea.  Now that it’s a new year that promises to offer more cool small shark science, it’s time for a look back at what happened with the spiny and…

And We’re Back

Well that was some break.  Quite a bit has been going on to make that long unannounced hiatus happen, both in the world of dogfish and in my own life.  Since it seems that this blog has been spared the weirdness going on at Southern…

Are Dogfish Running the Food Web?

When spiny dogfish come up in conversation, it’s usually in reference to their supposedly ravenous appetites and the possibility that they’re eating other, more economically valuable species out of the ecosystem.  Luckily for the very beginnings of my research career, this has lead to a…

Atlantic Spiny Dogfish Sustainability Certificate Suspended

In 2012, the Atlantic spiny dogfish fishery became one of the first shark fisheries to be certified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council (the first was another dogfish fishery, this one targeting North Pacific spiny dogfish in British Columbia waters).  The MSC is the…

SciREN 2015!

Last week I took part in the 2015 edition of SciREN Coast, an event that brings together researchers and teachers to get marine science into the classroom.  This year’s workshop was even bigger and better than last year’s, with 113 teachers from 13 North Carolina…

It’s a New Year

For a number of reasons, I decided (both intentionally and unintentionally) to wait until over a week into 2015 to do a “year in review” post.  Part of this is because I wanted to make sure I didn’t miss anything up to New Year’s Eve. …

Dogfish Stick Around in Back Sound and the Importance of Observations

This past week my latest paper, published in F1000 Research as part of their Elasmobranch Biology and Conservation collection, officially passed peer review.  This paper summarizes data collected from some spiny dogfish captured during the Back and Core Sound shark survey that seemed to be…

Perfect Little Killing Machines: The Jaws of Death

There’s a bit of a pardox of public opinion regarding the effectiveness of spiny dogfish as predators.  Depend on who you ask, they’re either forming a swimming wall of teeth annihilating everything in their path or they’re weak scavengers, poor excuses for sharks.  This much-maligned…

Perfect Little Killing Machines: an Introduction to the Series

Spiny dogfish have had a long history of interactions with humans.  These sharks, once reviled as pests, became valued food fish (particularly in Europe), were declared overfished, rebounded much more quickly than expected, and are now targeted by a certified sustainable fishery on the U.S….

Every Post is a Comeback Post

So I had originally intended to have a mini-blitz of material posted during Shark Week involving some of the topics that slip under the Shark Week radar, but for some reason technical difficulties arose that prevented me from successfully posting.  Also, in the middle of…