Category Archives: cownose rays

AES 2013: Days 1 & 2

Here it is, the first official recap post of this year’s AES.  I lack both a smartphone and the Twitter vigor of Dave, so I generally throw all the things that piqued my interest into one big post at the … Continue reading

Posted in AES, conference, conservation, cownose rays, ecology, fisheries management, North Carolina, sharks | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Summer of the Shark: Best Red Drum Survey Ever

In fisheries and marine science you have days that, by any objective standard, should be an amazing day in the field.  You get a ton of samples, the gear (mostly) works as planned, you find out some interesting stuff, and … Continue reading

Posted in cownose rays, fishing, gill nets, grad school, North Carolina, sharks, Summer of the Shark, wtf | Leave a comment

AES 2012: Day 2 Highlights

What a busy day.  I’ve only got a little bit of time to get this up before I have to head over to the poster session, and I saw a lot of very good talks today.  Keep following #AES2012 on … Continue reading

Posted in AES, conference, conservation, cownose rays, ecology, fisheries management, gut contents, North Carolina, sharks, spiny dogfish | Leave a comment

Summer of the Shark: Stingray City

My summer-long (likely into a little bit of autumn) quest to find sharks in the Pamlico Sound took me to the waters of the Neuse River this past Thursday.  I’ve been out on the Neuse looking for sharks on a … Continue reading

Posted in cownose rays, fishing, gill nets, grad school, methods, North Carolina, research, Summer of the Shark | Leave a comment

Summer of the Shark: Back to the Pamlico

Tuesday saw Evan, Andrea, and I head back to the Pamlico River to cover it with the longline (you can see why it was missing last time here) in my brave/foolish attempt to see if there are any sharks in … Continue reading

Posted in cownose rays, grad school, North Carolina, photography, research, Summer of the Shark | 2 Comments

Notes on Some of Those 79 “New” Shark Species

By now it’s somewhat old news that a recent study by Gavin Naylor and other researchers from all over (freely available here) has revealed that there may be up to 79 previously undiscovered shark and ray species, which complicates conservation … Continue reading

Posted in conservation, cownose rays, ecology, evolution, North Carolina, research, sharks, spiny dogfish | 2 Comments

Another Round on the Neuse

Late last summer, I embarked with an intrepid crew of Duke grad students to track bull sharks in the Neuse River.  We came up empty-handed that time, but a year later I found myself going back for another crack at … Continue reading

Posted in cownose rays, dolphins, dorkiness, grad school, North Carolina, photography, research, sharks | 2 Comments

NOAA/NMFS Plans to Reduce “Problem Species” Populations

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is often painted by fishermen as a rabidly pro-conservation agency hell-bent on putting them out of a job by protecting every species they used to fish.  However, leaked internal memos show that the agency … Continue reading

Posted in conservation, cownose rays, dolphins, fisheries management, NOAA, spiny dogfish, whales, wtf | 3 Comments

The Tidewater Recap

Last weekend I attended the 26th Annual Meeting of the Tidewater Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, better known as AFS Tidewater or just plain Tidewater.  To recap, this conference encompasses fisheries academics, students, and managers from the so-called “tidewater … Continue reading

Posted in AFS, conference, cownose rays, dorkiness, ecology, fisheries management, grad school, NOAA, North Carolina, spiny dogfish, striped bass | Leave a comment

Playing With Sharks in Charleston

As mentioned in my previous post, I’ve spent the weekend in Charleston hanging out with David “WhySharksMatter” Shiffman and taking part in the coastal shark survey run out of the Charleston SCDNR lab.  Since most of my work has been … Continue reading

Posted in cownose rays, fishing, gill nets, methods, research, sharks, tagging | 6 Comments